Transportation Safety Questionnaire for City of Eugene Candidates

This transportation safety questionnaire was distributed to all City of Eugene candidates running for office in the May 2020 primary election. It was developed by BEST and community partners to assist candidates in informing voters on an important issue of community concern.

Responses from all candidates were accepted through Thursday, April 30. There are eight questions in four sections: About You, Goals, Actions, and Funding Priorities. All questions were optional.

As a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit organization, BEST does not support or oppose any candidate for elected office. BEST is sharing the responses we received as a public service.

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Questions

  • Candidates
  • About You
    • Your own travel choices?
      How frequently do you travel in each of the following ways?
    • Safety in Eugene?
      Have you experienced, witnessed or heard about (near) crashes that have harmed or endangered people in Eugene (within the last five years)? Check all that apply.
    • Candidate statement?
      What do you wish to say to Eugene voters about your goals, plans and priorities for transportation safety if elected?
  • Goals
    • Eugene’s efforts?
      In a typical year, how many people do you estimate die or are seriously injured in traffic crashes in Eugene? What are your goals for transportation safety? To advance these goals, should Eugene do more, less, or about the same as it has been doing?
    • Vision Zero?
      If elected, how will you work to realize the goals of the Vision Zero Resolution adopted by the Eugene City Council in November 2015?
  • Actions
    • Specific actions?
      How strongly do you oppose or support each of the following possible enforcement and engineering actions?
    • Successful and additional actions?
      What are the most successful actions Eugene is already taking based on the “Six E’s” of transportation safety? If elected, what additional actions will you take?
  • Funding Priorities
    • Priority projects over 20 years?
      The Eugene Transportation System Plan outlines priority projects over 20 years. Are these the right priorities for Eugene? Will you advocate for different priorities?

Responses

Candidates

In the May 19, 2020 Primary Election in the City of Eugene 20 candidates have filed for 5 seats (listed by ward and then alphabetically):

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)
Sean Dwyer

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)
Eliza Kashinsky

Candice King (for Ward 1)
Candice King

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)
Tim Morris

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)
Emily Semple

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)
Daniel Liev Williams

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)
Kate Davidson

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)
Matt Keating

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)
Douglas Barr

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)
Charles “Cliff” Gray

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)
Claire Syrett

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)
Randy Groves

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)
Ryan Moore

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)
Thomas Hiura

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)
Robert Patterson

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)
Benjamin Ricker

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)
Lucy Vinis

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)
Stacey Westover

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)
Matthew Yook

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)
Zondie Zinke

About You

Please begin by telling us about yourself.

Your own travel choices?

How frequently do you travel in each of the following ways?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Few times a year.

I answered these questions based on my typical transportation patterns for the past three years—for the past month and a half, I have been exclusively telecommuting. Prior to starting a job in Cottage Grove, my primary commute methods were walking and the bus.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a year.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I live centrally so I can walk most places. I love to take transit when my schedule and destination permit.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

Driving alone? Few times a month.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Don’t know.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I am lucky to live in the heart of Downtown Eugene in a “20 minute neighborhood.” My job, grocery store, parks, and pharmacy are all within 20 minutes of walking distance of my home. The design of my neighborhood makes it very simple for me to use alternative transportation—so much so that I often have to jump start my car due to lack of use! I believe that with updating our local zoning and land-use laws, we can cultivate more compact communities and foster safer alternative transportation options.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

Driving alone? Few times a month.
Carpooling? Never.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Few times a year.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I live and work downtown and walk everywhere! I do have a car but rarely drive except to get supplies or go to a meeting too far away to walk.

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

Driving alone? Never.
Carpooling? Never.
Riding a bus? Few times a month.
Bicycling? Several times a week.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Never.

I have never owned a car. I have been using LTD services for 20 years, and for the past two years I’ve primarily been using a bicycle for work commuting, as well as running errands outside the Eugene downtown area. Within the downtown area, where I live, I almost always prefer walking.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a year.
Riding a bus? Few times a month.
Bicycling? Several times a week.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I try to ride my bike as often as possible. I also live on the LTD #28 and take the bus as often as possible.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

Driving alone? Few times a month.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Few times a year.
On a skateboard or scooter? No Answer.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

Governor Brown’s Stay Home, Save Lives executive order has certainly changed my travel behavior for the better. Like many, I now telecommute to work daily and thanks to the flexibility of my colleagues on the LCC Board of Education, KLCC Public Radio Foundation Board, Eugene Public Library Foundation Board, and the Democratic Party of Oregon administration committee, we now engage in regular virtual board and committee meetings.

Reviewing my monthly budget, I find that I have significantly reduced my fuel expense and vehicular travel by more than 500 miles/month.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a year.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Few times a month.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I have a medical condition that prevents me from riding a bike and that has other impacts that sometimes make walking challenging. I have been telecommuting exclusively during the current pandemic and will likely continue to use this after it has passed for some part of my work.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Never.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Few times a month.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I am retired so carpooling really doesn’t apply and there is no bus service to my house. At the same time, I do occasionally take advantage of Park-and-Ride. When I do drive, my trips are generally short distances and I consciously attempt to group necessary travel into fewer trips.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Several times a week.
Riding a bus? Few times a month.
Bicycling? Few times a year.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Few times a month.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Few times a month.

These are strange times and transportation habits have changed for many of us due to pandemic concerns. Months ago, my most frequent modes of transportation outside of solo trips were carpooling and public transit. We are lucky to have EmX service in West Eugene and I have certainly taken advantage of it. Once it is safer to do so, I have pledged to be less reliant on my Prius and ride the bus to at least half of the City Council meetings because I believe our elected representatives should role model the choices and behaviors for which they advocate.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Few times a month.
On a skateboard or scooter? Few times a year.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

I am an ardent environmentalist, and I believe deeply that a Mayor should lead by example, with consistent integrity. That is why I have not spent a dime on gas in years, and I drive a fully electric Nissan Leaf. Electric vehicle infrastructure (specifically creating Eugene’s first DC fast charger) is a big part of my climate plan. People in the community also know me as an avid cyclist—I have biked from Eugene to various other states, and included cycling in my first hip-hop music video; a pretty novel thing to do, and very Eugene. (Watch my YouTube music video “Gradient – Fire Fly.”)

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a year.
Riding a bus? Never.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

This is an odd time as we’re staying home. I normally commute by car daily to work; and walk all over downtown every day. Now I telecommute all day five days/week.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Never.
Bicycling? Several times a week.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Never.

Like many working people, most of my driving is employment related, and it’s impossible to do my job without a car. I have lived in cities where I didn’t need a car, and it was great. Car ownership and use is an economic burden, as well as being environmentally damaging.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

Driving alone? Few times a month.
Carpooling? Never.
Riding a bus? Few times a month.
Bicycling? Several times a week.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Never.

I’m a 3 minute walk from a grocery store and on a major bus line. I also bike pretty quick so my alternative modes to driving are usually just for when I have my child.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Safety in Eugene?

Have you experienced, witnessed or heard about (near) crashes that have harmed or endangered people in Eugene (within the last five years)? Check all that apply.

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Don’t know.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Witnessed. Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

In a motor vehicle? Experienced. Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Witnessed. Heard.
Bicycling? Witnessed. Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Witnessed. Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Don’t know.
Walking? Experienced.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

Four way stops can be very difficult for safe crossing when walking. Drivers often do not look for or see pedestrians and, sometimes, when they do, they assume right-of-way for themselves. It’s important to practice defensive walking.

I live on and near busy downtown streets and can hear near-miss traffic encounters much too often. And, of course, they aren’t all misses. Fortunately, I haven’t witnessed serious injuries or deaths.

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Don’t know.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

With the exception of a few particular intersections in downtown Eugene, I have almost always felt personally safe riding my bicycle in many places around town. However, I do stick to bike paths, bike lanes, and designated bike routes whenever possible, because in areas without those options I have often felt at increased risk of an accident with a motor vehicle.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

In a motor vehicle? Heard.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Don’t know.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

I think it’s very important people wear helmets when cycling, skateboarding, motorcycling.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

In a motor vehicle? Experienced. Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

According to Eugene Police Department’s Traffic Enforcement Unit, there are three main reasons for car crashes and injuries: speeding, distracted driving, and failure, or improper use of seatbelts.

My recent experience is limited to getting rear-ended in 2018 by a presumably distracted driver and sharing the pain of a dear friend losing her young-adult daughter, a passenger in a fatal car crash involving alcohol and speeding here in South Eugene.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

In a motor vehicle? Heard.
Riding a bus? Don’t know.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? No answer.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Witnessed.
On a skateboard or scooter? Don’t know.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

I was always very informed of these occurrences as fire chief, and have seen the aftermath of hundreds of these types of events as an emergency responder.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Don’t know.
Bicycling? Witnessed. Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Don’t know.
Walking? Witnessed. Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

Transportation safety is an important concern in Ward 8 and there is certainly work left to do. One prominent example of needed improvements is Bailey Hill Road. This street is currently classified as a minor arterial and is straight for long stretches, which results in higher driving speeds. This creates potentially life-threatening problems when it passes right next to Churchill High School and cuts directly through multiple residential neighborhoods. Indeed, I recently learned that one of my core volunteers’ sons was hit by a car a couple of years ago while crossing it and I know of two other incidents occurring even more recently. In my eyes, this road is an ideal candidate for traffic calming projects and/or a reduction to the speed limit.

Parking can present another challenge, especially when it coincides with bicycle infrastructure. Using the Fern Ridge Trail as an example, cars are frequently allowed to park within six feet of crosswalks and sidewalk intersections which obstructs the view of both approaching bikers and drivers. Especially when tall vehicles are present, it can literally be impossible to see approaching traffic until you are only several feet away. I have been a strong advocate for amending our city’s design standards to fix this by creating safer distances between pedestrian/bicycle intersections and allowable on-street parking areas.

A related traffic safety solution for which I have also advocated is the concept of protected bike lanes involving some form of physical divider, aside from just street paint. We have piloted these in several parts of the city already and I believe the data show that they not only increase the safety of bicyclists and drivers, they also increase the perception of safety and can contribute to higher rates of bicycling. I support the creation of more of these protected bike lanes throughout the city as a means for us to not only prevent harm, but also to get us closer to meeting our climate goals.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Witnessed.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Don’t know.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

I attended one of the last in-person City Council Work Sessions on March 9th, which included some encouraging information about the Franklin Boulevard Transformation Project. There is above-average federal support for this project already, and it will reduce the hazards associated with the current structure of the boulevard, in a growing part of the city. The basic idea is to reduce the speed limit and replace traffic lights with five traffic circles. I am very excited about the potential for this; traffic circles have been very successful (for example, in Glenwood) as the public has become more accustomed to them.

One of the areas of greatest concern for me is Highway 99. When I would drive it every day for Graduate Eugene airport shuttles, pedestrian foot traffic in the roads induced anxiety for many motorists I have talked to in the area. It did the same for many of my passengers.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

In a motor vehicle? Witnessed.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Witnessed.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

I know a number of people who have been hit by cars either while walking or biking. Too many of our streets don’t enable cars, bikes and pedestrians to share the roadway safely.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

In a motor vehicle? Experienced. Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Experienced. Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter? Don’t know.
Walking? Experienced. Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

It’s been my experience that it’s always the same streets that have the most severe accidents, so when I learned that 9% of streets had most of the fatalities I was not surprised. I have lived by two of these hot spots.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

In a motor vehicle? Experienced.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Experienced.
On a skateboard or scooter? Heard.
Walking? Witnessed.
Using a mobility device? Witnessed.

There’s too few times people check to see if someone not in a car is using the crosswalk or bike lane, and a lot of public space is paved towards an automobile culture as buses grow more limited.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Candidate statement?

What do you wish to say to Eugene voters about your goals, plans and priorities for transportation safety if elected?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

In addition to the direct and indirect impacts of crashes on those who experience them, Eugene must also increase its share of trips taking by bike, walking, transit, and other active transportation methods in order to meet our climate recovery goals. In order for walking and biking to be an appealing transportation options for residents, it must be safe. As it stands now, far too many people are dying and being seriously injured on our streets. We must fix this.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

I think that for a city of it’s size and density, Eugene traffic is surprisingly dense, but in Eugene drivers are I think our transit goals should emphasize increasing public education and awareness about pedestrian safety, and sharing the road with smaller vehicles.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

Traffic deaths are preventable incidents. While accidents do happen, through long-term planning Eugene can reduce traffic fatalities and prevent life-altering injuries from happening. As a City Councilor, I want to renew Eugene’s commitment in Vision Zero. Many residents of Eugene have access to alternative modes of transportation but choose not to use them out of safety. Specifically in the Jefferson Westside neighborhood, there are many complaints regarding bike safety and unobservant drivers endangering lives. If we truly wish to maintain the title of one of the top“ most bikeable cities,” then we must implement policies to protect bikers and encourage more people to get out of their cars. As a housing advocate, I believe transportation safety can be improved through appropriate land use and zoning laws, by intentionally shaping our city’s neighborhoods and making it easier for residents to get around. As an environmental advocate and a supporter of longitudinal emergency planning, I know that transportation is tied to food security in Eugene. The majority of food in Eugene is transported via I-5 from Portland and San Francisco, when increasing local production would make us less reliant on food that is trucked a long distance, cut down on pollution, and reduce wear and tear on our roads. If Eugene were hit with the Cascadia earthquake, we would be cut off from deliveries and only have a 3 day food supply. As a City Council, we should explore options such as multi-use zoning laws that allow for more local food production. By doing so, we will be better prepared for natural disasters and reduce the amount of road repairs needed in Eugene. Those funds could then be used to promote healthier alternative transportation options.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

When I talk with people about changes they want, I always encourage to figure out how they can tie them to the Climate Recovery Ordinance and Vision Zero. Council approved those goals, so how can we argue against strategies that support them?!

I listen to my constituents and respond to their concerns. I’ve been in meetings with Jefferson Street, Washington Park and Chambers Street neighbors to discuss problems and solutions and bring them to staff’ and management’s attention. We need more improvements, faster—pedal to the metal (in this case)!

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

While not directly related to transportation safety, I believe Eugene should be aggressively perusing increased accessibility to transportation options beyond personal cars. I would like to see LTD services increased so stops are more frequently serviced and greater service coverage within Lane County. I would also want to pursue innovative programs such as bicycle ownership subsidies and car-free neighborhoods.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

We need to be accountable to our transportation plans. The City generates a lot of plans. I think we can do better at following through on them. As your next Eugene City Councilor, I will do my best to ensure accountability.

For example: we need to follow through with the Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan: The Eugene Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan (“the Plan”) provides the City of Eugene with the projects and policies necessary to create a first-class city for bicycling and walking, reduce overall carbon emissions, and provide for a well-designed, integrated, safe, and efficient multi-modal transportation system. The City of Eugene currently has a total of 157 miles of bikeways (41 miles of shared-use paths, 81 miles of bike lanes, and 35 miles of signed routes). This Plan proposes that the City of Eugene develop 25.2 miles of sidewalks, 12.1 miles of shared-use facilities, and 110.9 miles of bikeways within the next 20 years.

Additionally, providing public safety is a core responsibility of a city. Funding our Public Works and Eugene Police Department adequately is critical.

The three primary causes of crashes are poor street design, dangerous behaviors such as texting while driving, and driving while impaired by drugs or alcohol. None of these is inevitable. Data on locations and causes of crashes can guide changes in street design—changes whose cost can be reduced by including them in planned maintenance and repair projects. Crashes caused by drivers’ behavior and impairment can be reduced by a combination of education and law enforcement.

Once it’s understood that crashes are avoidable, progress toward the goal of zero fatalities becomes not just possible but imperative.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

I stand with community stakeholders, Better Eugene-Springfield Transportation (BEST) experts, and all families affected by traffic fatalities or life-altering injuries to support, implement, and realize Eugene’s Vision Zero Action Plan to eliminate deaths and life-changing injuries on our shared transportation system by 2035.

As stated so clearly in the council-approved Action Plan, “Achieving Vision Zero requires a true culture change—from one where lives lost or severely harmed is an accepted daily occurrence to one where deaths and life-changing injuries are unacceptable outcomes of simply using our streets.”

I am committed to honoring and upholding Vision Zero principles and changing policies, practices, and programs while viewing our budget and priorities through an equitable lens of transportation safety for all.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

I believe we need to continue to do more to increase safety on our streets. I advocated for our council to adopt our Vision Zero framework and continue to push us to do more in terms of engineering and enforcement. I serve as chair of the Lane Area Commission on Transportation and use that platform to advocate for greater safety through improved bike and pedestrian infrastructure as well supporting expansion of local Safe Routes to School programming. My support for Eugene’s public safety payroll tax was informed, in part, by the expectation that we would be able to dedicate more patrol officers to traffic enforcement which has been missing from our community for too many years. I will continue to make sure that our traffic engineer and chief of police are doing their part to ensure our streets become safer through better engineering choices and dedicated traffic enforcement.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

As a retired career firefighter with our city, I responded to hundreds crashes involving vehicles, bicyclists and pedestrians. I’ve seen quite a bit in my 36 plus year career. Based on my experience, I understand that not only is this problem real, but that it’s preventable. I support the tenants of Vision Zero just like I did while still your fire chief. Prior to Vision Zero, I was involved in the Eye-to-Eye traffic safety program. Currently, I believe we are on a good trajectory as a city, but that we can always improve with implementing our engineering solutions, public education and behavior modification, and enforcement. If elected I will continue to support Vision Zero and I believe I will provide a unique perspective that doesn’t currently exist on council—that as a responder who has experienced the results of a failed transportation system hundreds if not thousands of times.

GOALS: Our transportation system is critical to the movement of people, goods and delivery of services throughout our community. As such, it is government’s responsibility to provide an effective and safe system. My goals for our system is to maintain and improve our infrastructure, which includes an element of safety, to continue educational efforts directed a people who use our system that are distracted, impaired, or choose to speed and/or commit other traffic offenses. This applies to all forms of transportation. In general terms, I support the six “E’s” of transportation safety, and I believe we need to continue with our Transportation Safety Plan.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

Much of this was discussed above and I will do my best to avoid redundancy. I relied exclusively on bicycling and public transit for nine years of my adult life and I believe I am the Ward 8 candidate most familiar with these systems. There is ample evidence demonstrating that the safer people perceive these systems to be, the more frequently they will use them. Therefore, in addition to preventing bodily and economic harm, traffic safety concepts must also play a vital role in our climate recovery planning and I will continue to champion this idea if elected to Council. This is one of the reasons I have received the vast majority of endorsements by local environmental organizations including the Oregon League of Conservation Voters, Sunrise Eugene, the Sierra Club-Many Rivers Group, and more.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

When I think of transportation safety in my lifelong hometown of Eugene, I think of a national campaign called 8 80 Cities. They act toward a noble goal of making cities work for the average 8 year-old, all the way up to the average 80 year-old (and beyond).

I mention this because Eugene should empower safe transit for all of its residents and visitors, across all demographics and abilities. We have a very engaged citizenry; growing up here, I saw first-hand the vitriol that entered our public dialogue about EmX. I believe my 7 years of policymaking experience have taught me the right skills to build consensus around common sense approaches. I will outline a few of those in this questionnaire, and I encourage concerned Eugeneans to reach out to me at 541-510-9987 or hiura2020.org/contact. I would love to dialogue with you.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

Transportation and transportation safety have been top priorities during my term as Mayor. I have a formal role as a member of the Metropolitan Planning Commission that oversees our local use of federal transportation funds and I have voiced my commitment to investment in transportation through presentations at two meetings of the US Conference of Mayors (USCM) as well as at the Transportation Subcommittee of the USCM. Our investment in safe, affordable transportation options—both transit and active transportation—is key in our response to the dual challenges of climate change and population growth.

I am fully committed to Eugene’s Vision Zero Action Plan. Between 2016 and 2018, we have taken critical steps toward the plans outlined in Vision-Zero. This includes improving street design with protected bike lanes, speed limit changes on high crash streets like River Road and new street lights near the University District. We have also moved toward lessening dangerous behaviors seen in traffic accidents by deploying speed readers by the Eugene Police and implementing the “traffic safety pledge” for residents. We can see that these methods are working. Between 2016 and 2017, Eugene saw a decrease in our deaths and major injuries due to careless driving, failure to yield and speeding. But, we still have a lot of work to do to realize our Vision Zero goals. I am committed to continuing to encourage safe practices between drivers and pedestrians, reducing driving, walking and bicycling under the influence and generally working to achieve our goal of reaching zero deaths related to transportation.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

I truly appreciate the way much of the transportation system is designed in Eugene. We have excellent independent bike paths, and it’s easy to get around much of the town.

My priority would be to continue with the Vision Zero goals and implementation. We have a well thought out transportation plan already.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

A push for more routes and no fares, including the EmX, would help improve an alternative mode of transportation aside from passenger automobiles that cause life changing accidents.

There’s a couple restructuring of streets in other countries that subsidize less fossil fuels which would be great models to replicate, as well as communicating to the city the reason speed devices are put into place is people cause people keep speeding, and people are dying. I will push for ways to help pedestrians and bikes do not have to interact with traffic. I will put up more signs to indicate pedestrian interface, either with the road or the path they’re trying to transit with crosswalks and bike path signs, and I will continue to work with neighborhoods for effective traffic calming measures. While people grumble about traffic issues or potholes, the reliance on folks that have studied this and calculate this is science people can get behind, and that’s always a good thing to encourage.

I will also make alternative modes more available and accessible through a “Bike, Scooter, and Helmet” Library for Safe Routes to School.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Goals

Now tell us about the transportation safety goals you support.

Eugene’s efforts?

In a typical year, how many people do you estimate die or are seriously injured in traffic crashes in Eugene? What are your goals for transportation safety? To advance these goals, should Eugene do more, less, or about the same as it has been doing?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

I estimate approximately 50 people a year are being killed or seriously injured in crashes in Eugene. These are avoidable deaths and injuries—Eugene should be bringing that number down to zero so that we all can move around our community safely. Eugene should be doing more than it has been doing.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

According to the most recent data on Eugene traffic fatalities there are about 10 fatal crashes in Eugene, each year. I think Vision Zero has a strong, clear vision and a robust implementation plan. However, progress on some plan elements appears to have stalled. An integral and low barrier piece of the plan concerns fostering local awareness, engagement, education, and a general culture of traffic safety. Unfortunately, we have yet to see much movement from the (recently hired?) Community Engagement Coordinator. Eugene City government can and should inquire about plan next steps, and gain understanding about how we can support the work of the Engagement coordinator.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

I estimate that in an average year in Eugene, there are over 1,000 traffic crashes that lead to death or serious injury. Eugene must do more for ALL road users, including people walking, biking, taking public transit, and driving. Eugene is plagued with broken sidewalks, unprotected bike lanes, and disconnected transportation options. We have solutions, such as the Transportation System Plan and the Bike and Pedestrian Plan; we just require a city council ready to fully fund and support these plans to secure the safety of Eugene’s pedestrians.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

On average, six people die and 47 are seriously injured in traffic crashes. (I looked it up.) We adopted Vision Zero and we are far from our goal. We must to do more. My goal is zero.

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

I have no knowledge to make an informed estimate in how many people are injured in accidents. While I have not given careful thought to traffic issues specifically, I would like to see use of personal vehicles go down considerably to get as close to a zero carbon footprint as possible. This would have the obvious secondary effect of reduced traffic accidents.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

See Eugene crash data.

If Vision Zero is implemented, transportation safety will be greatly enhanced. I support the plan.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

On average, someone is killed or severely injured every eight days while traveling on our city streets; that translates to 45-50 persons per year, here in Eugene.

Simply put, this is unacceptable.

The ultimate goal for transportation safety is to reduce the loss of life that occurs via traffic crashes on our streets.

We should continue to use the Vision Zero Action Plan as a roadmap to action. Realizing the volumes of stellar work the BEST Task Force Members and Technical Advisory Committee Members poured into the strategic plan, I want to pause and thank you for memorializing and recognizing the pain and suffering of our community members, including Karen Creighton, a friend of mine whose daughter Noelle was tragically taken at age 23-1/2 because she was a passenger in a car driven by a friend who was intoxicated and speeding.

One death is one too many.

We can and should do everything in power to remember Noelle and all families like hers who have lost loved ones who were simply by trying to get from point A to pint B.

Working together, we will advance the 2035 goals outlined and key benchmarks established by the Vision Zero Action Plan.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

I estimate we lose five or six people to fatal crashes each year. I believe we need to step up traffic enforcement in order to reduce speeding and the frequency of people running red lights as well as driving while intoxicated. In addition, we need to keep pursuing the smarter measures we have started to take with our street engineering that has helped improve safety at various intersections around the city. As I stated in my prior answer, I believe we need to do more to improve safety on our streets.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

An average of about 47 deaths or serious injuries occur each year from traffic crashes. To continue work towards the actions recommended in the Vision Zero program. These actions center around the four areas that impact the likelihood and severity of crashes. These include street design, impairment, dangerous behaviors and engagement and accountability. A lot of work has already taken place around education, street design and the enforcement around dangerous behaviors, but with the goal being zero fatalities and serious injuries, more needs to be done.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

If past trends have continued, we are averaging about 70 deaths and serious injuries per year on our transportation systems. Obviously, any non-zero number is unacceptable and we must continue to work towards the goals of Vision Zero. I believe Eugene can do more in this area especially when it comes to bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. I will continue to push for expanded implementation of protected bike lanes, traffic calming in known problem areas, common sense changes to system design that improve visibility and overall safety, and more.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

We know of about 100 fatal and life-changing injury crashes in 2016-2017. That is abhorrent. This issue deserves more upfront attention in the campaigns of every candidate. I have published the most extensive list of plans (#64PolicyGoals) in the history of Eugene mayoral races, because I strongly believe the city should do more on these issues.

One of my long-standing campaign proposals has been better bike path lighting, and my experience with voters across the political spectrum is that there is broad support for this.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

As many as 120 people die or are seriously injured in traffic crashes in Eugene each year. My goals for transportation safety are aligned with the goals in Eugene’s Vision-Zero Action Plan. We must reduce the number of deaths and injuries related to transportation through methods that target high crash streets by lowering speed limits, encouraging safe transportation practices and putting protections in place for our bikers and pedestrians. Eugene should move forward as quickly as possible with these changes.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

The stats I saw were for Lane County, which had about 55-60 deaths and 3000 injuries, some if which were Eugene. My goals would be to reduce risk, and to ensure everyone has the ability to get where they need to go. What we are doing is working.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

I don’t know an exact number, but even one is too many since they’re preventable. From what I understand they’re working with the concerned neighborhoods as best as they can with the resources they have, but not knowing more I always wonder why these repairs, constructions, and upgrades take so long. I appreciate how they’re pushing for more bike friendly infrastructure despite some vocal grumbling, it’d be nice if they were in more places or if drains weren’t set with curbs to create ponds in the winter, but making them ADA safe was great and long overdue.

Reflecting on places where I’ve seen crosswalks and new lights pop up seems like there’s been some responsiveness to some of the problem issues they can address. If we’re upgrading roads I’d definitely like more research done into how much more it would cost to make them more pedestrian friendly by not having them interact with traffic as much as possible, and look to strengthen our public transit system.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Vision Zero?

If elected, how will you work to realize the goals of the Vision Zero Resolution adopted by the Eugene City Council in November 2015?

Vision Zero is a strategy to eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. First implemented in Sweden in the 1990s, Vision Zero has proved successful across Europe—and now it’s gaining momentum in major American cities. For example, see What is Vision Zero?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

The Vision Zero Resolution states a broad vision, but to realize that vision, countless small adjustments and individual projects are needed. If elected, I will work to realize the goals of the Vision Zero Resolution first by supporting the individual projects that will increase safety on our streets. I will request regular updates on our progress towards accomplishing our goal, and adjustments if we aren’t making sufficient progress. I’ll ensure appropriate funding for projects that will help us improve the safety for people traveling around Eugene by all modes, and rely on data and solid information to do so.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

To move progress on this initiative Eugene city government should normalize semi-annual progress reporting, and be prepared to increase the project budget incrementally where there is a demonstrated need.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

Supporting Vision Zero requires taking action and not just paying lip service to these priorities. In order to achieve the goals of Net Zero and eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries, City Council must be ready to take strong stances and make difficult policy decisions to move forward. I believe one of the big steps we need to take for supporting Vision Zero is fully funding and implementing the Transportation System Plan. For example, I support the implementation of Red Light Cameras in heavy traffic areas to not only reduce traffic incidents from occurring, but also providing additional revenue to fund the TSP. As a City Councilor, I plan to advocate for re-prioritizing how Eugene manages roadways.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

I support lower speed limits, traffic calming measures, protected bike lanes, safe traffic crossings, enforcement of speed limits and red lights, and I think we should require bike helmets for everyone.

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

I was not aware of the Vision Zero Resolution or Action Plan before this survey. After having reviewed the material passed by the city, however, I was surprised to see very little emphasis on trying increase the capacity of the bus system and alternative transportation use, which I would think would be an obvious component of eliminating traffic fatalities. I have no objection to any part of the plan as is, but I would want and expect the city to incorporate strategies beyond adjusting speed limits and replanning high-risk roadways.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

The framework for realizing the goals of the Vision Zero Resolution is described in the plan, which you have linked to. I support the plan.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

I will work with parents, community members, communities of concern, stakeholders, task force members, fellow councilors, lawmakers, and agency partners such as EPD, Lane Professional Firefighters, ODOT, Lane Council of Government (LCOG), 4J, Lane ESD, and institutions of higher education to advance actionable items outlined in Eugene’s Vision Zero Action Plan including but not limited to:

    – A 21st Century redesign of city streets.

    – Supporting change in state law regarding speed limit setting. A conversation I had just last night with Nadine from South Eugene reinforced this need and reminded me that 2020’s HB 4103 would have allowed local municipalities to set their own speeds. Unfortunately, that particular bill was a casualty of the 2020 short-session Republican walkout; it is my hope that it will be brought back in 2021.

    – Supporting deployment of DUII enforcement and education.

    – Increasing number of speed readers on city streets.

    – Empowering neighborhoods to develop specific safety, housing, and transportation programs.

    – Reinstating high school transportation safety curriculum (including pedestrian & bicycle safety).

    – Partnering with municipal colleagues, countywide, statewide, and federal lawmakers to establish sustainable funding sources for Vision Zero infrastructure projects, education/outreach efforts, and council-approved program management.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

As I mentioned above, we need to increase traffic enforcement and keep improving our street engineering. I will continue to advocate for these measures. In addition, I will seek to move our city forward with education measures such as yard signs that promote safe speeds which have been used by Portland and other cities as part of their Vision Zero efforts.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

Here locally, I think it begins with leadership from the City Council and then cascades out to Public Works Transportation Planning AND Maintenance, Police, Fire & EMS, the City’s Neighborhood Program. Much like our efforts as a city to combat climate change, Community Safety, including transportation safety, needs to become a part of everything we do. As the tenants promoted by Vision Zero and the City’s Transportation Safety Plan become ingrained in our culture and mindset, our efforts will become more successful in eliminating crash fatalities and serious injuries.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

To add to what I wrote above, a core element of our campaign for City Council is changing the way we conduct public engagement in Eugene. I believe that our Councilors can be stronger interfaces and liaisons between our communities and our city government. I am the only candidate in the Ward 8 race who has pledged to conduct regular town halls in our actual neighborhoods and to do things like canvass and call residents outside of just election season. I believe an over-reliance on the formal, every-other-week Council meetings downtown results in skewed input and in certain areas and populations being left out of the process.

Increased public engagement on the part of our Councilors will advance the goals of Vision Zero by enabling us to reach out and include underrepresented populations. As stronger links to the community, we will be able to obtain better pictures of problem areas and potential dangers that may have been overlooked. A central element of the Vision Zero plan is dependent upon private individuals identifying potential issues and reporting them through the city website. Our City Councilors can play a bigger role in facilitating this process and I will champion the idea once elected.

By the way, I encourage your members to check out the reporting tools on the city’s website if they are not already familiar.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

Transparency and communication are big parts of my candidacy. I have demonstrated commitment to these principles in my weekly video podcasts with community leaders, and with my daily Humanity EUG News magazines which highlight municipal planning issues right alongside hot national stories.

I mention these tenets of my commitment because I believe strongly in the Vision Zero action plan. It is an example of attainable idealism, but that is only the case if the city can extend its messaging to people who are otherwise disengaged. My candidacy does that in myriad ways, and as the first Eugene mayor to be a hip-hop artist, or a young person, or an LGBT person, or a person of color, I am uniquely qualified to disseminate the messaging I find important to diverse communities. You can rest assured that I find Vision Zero to be important.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

Transportation will continue to be a major issue in Eugene as we strive to meet our Climate Action Plan 2.0 Goals (CAP). The road map contained in the CAP 2.0 is founded on the Transportation System Plan. In addition to continuing to build out and expand our biking infrastructure, the city is working closely with LTD in both short and long-term planning to improve the accessibility and efficiency of the bus system. In the short-term, this means supporting LTD’s emphasis on increasing ridership by ensuring the most frequent bus service on the most heavily used corridors. In the long-term, we will focus improvements on the major corridors, converting them from car-centric to multi-modal, making them safer for pedestrians and bikers, as well as improving transit.

I fully support the Vision Zero resolution that was adopted in 2015 which is Eugene’s road map for transportation safety. Encouraging people to use alternative transportation methods like biking, walking and public transit are paramount to realizing our CAP 2.0 goals. However, with that comes the critical piece of safety. As we encourage more people to use alternative transportation, we also run the risk of increasing the number of fatalities and injuries related to transportation. Ensuring that Vision Zero and CAP 2.0 are implemented side-by-side is critical to making sure that our climate goals are met while also protecting the citizens who are helping us reach that climate goal by using alternative transit.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

(no response)

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

I will make sure the people that have the interest of transit running smoothly, with a focus on building more support for alternative to single passenger automobiles and seeing what type of money we can get from the Federal Government to help transition in this direction since we have the chair of the House Transportation Committee and a Senator on the Senate Finance Committee as Federal Reps. We need more alternatives to cars that aren’t an extra hour of commuting.

If there were concerns coming of a dangerous area, I’d send in folks to canvas to neighborhood to get residents thoughts to make sure we can make things move for safety and accessibility as quickly as possible now, since we’re still going to be building to meet our future infrastructure demands as well and with the current push for low missing middle sprawl it’ll start costing Eugene more money.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Actions

Professionals talk about the “Six E’s” of transportation safety:

  1. Encouragement,
  2. Education,
  3. Enforcement,
  4. Engineering,
  5. Equity, and
  6. Evaluation.
Specific actions?

How strongly do you oppose or support each of the following possible enforcement and engineering actions?

  1. Lowering speed limits to minimize fatal or serious injury crashes?
  2. Using automated cameras to enforce speed limits or stop lights?
  3. Removing parking spaces to create safer areas for people bicycling?
  4. Installing better crossing infrastructure to for people walking?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

The faster a car is traveling, the more likely a crash will result in serious injury or death. However, we know that just lowering speed limits by changing the signs doesn’t change behavior. We need to ensure that the ways our streets are designed encourages driving at slower speeds. This includes things such as narrowing lanes and other cues that make our neighborhood streets feel less like high-speed expressways.

Over the past few years, I have seen far more instances of red-light running in Eugene than I have in the past. Without enforcement, this will continue, and given other community safety needs, red-light cameras allow us to enforce this law while freeing up our officers to accomplish safety measures that can’t be achieved by cameras.

Too much of our land has been devoted for the storage of cars, as opposed to serving more people. Given the choice between prioritizing people and prioritizing parking, I prioritize people.

Every corner is a crosswalk in Oregon, but not every corner is treated like a crosswalk. I’ve seen how driver behavior is changed by better crossing infrastructure, making it safer for those walking. The more robust crossing infrastructure we have, the better for the safety of our community.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat oppose.
Removing parking spaces? Don’t know.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

All of these are recommended interventions, and i generally support them, with the exception to more automated cameras. These tend to be costly, imperfect and add to the overall surveillance state. They are also a more reactionary strategy, and I think we should focus our efforts on proactive strategies. I think in the case of traffic cameras, they could be implemented sparsely and strategically at “high risk” red lights near highway off-ramps and high speed areas.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

I support the items above because they are direct actions Eugene can take to make a real difference in our commitment to road safety and protections for the most vulnerable.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

I support them all. Injuries are much less serious at lower speeds. Biking and walking are the best choices and I put protected bike lanes and safe sidewalks at the top of my list.

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

I only somewhat support using automated cameras, because while in theory this can be an effective tool, in practice a number of cities have either misused or intentionally abused this system to generate fine revenue with little oversight. I would only support an automated system that had a publicly available algorithm for how vehicles are tracked, the threshold for ticketing, and the rate of ticketing, so it is transparent to citizens that the automated system is programmed fairly and without bias.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Somewhat support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat support.
Removing parking spaces? Somewhat support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

Lowering speed limits—especially around schools and parks—and installing improved infrastructure for pedestrians are no-brainers.

In regards to automated cameras, I am far more supportive of Vision Zero’s suggestions calling for A) an increase of the number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) of Eugene Police Department Patrol Operations Division so that officers have discretionary time to enforce traffic safety; and B) purchasing additional speed reader trailers to deploy on arterial streets. However, I fully understand the direct revenue that comes with installation of enforcement cameras for red light violations; however, I am more concerned about changing the dangerous behavior of motorists as they are driving, not weeks after a violation. Especially since the legislature has not yet fully addressed the legality of installing such an automated enforcement mechanism, at this juncture I find myself in the “somewhat supportive” category.

Regarding parking spaces, I continue to advocate for increased electric vehicle charging stations while prioritizing premiere parking for e-vehicles throughout our community. Further, from a mobility justice point of view, I am concerned about “removing parking spaces” when access is mandated by the Americans for Disabilities Act.

Moreover, in a COVID- era of social distancing, removing parking spaces to allow for “safer areas for people bicycling” may be an unsafe action for motorists who are members of vulnerable populations who may be encouraged to stay in their vehicle while shopping or conducting business. I would like to see data in a post-COVID world before making a pre-COVID decision and I would want to communicate with key stakeholders, first responders, planning commission members, public works department, ODOT, and our for-profit, nonprofit, education sector partners before making such a decision.

That being said, as outlined in the Vision Zero Action Plan, I am fully supportive of council-approved Street Design Guidelines for new city streets and I will champion commonsense, equitable redesign of our city streets to safely allow access for multimodal projects—active transportation, especially pedestrians and cyclists—as well as motorists and public transit passengers alike.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

I support these measures because they have been proven to create a safer environment for all users of our streets and road. In addition, they are within the city’s power to implement.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat support.
Removing parking spaces? Somewhat oppose.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

Lowering speed limits affords people using the transportation system more time to react to dangerous situations and conflict between users. Automated cameras have had success in some communities, but there is a significant cost to installing and maintaining their use. I do believe they are appropriate at high conflict intersections, but they drain resources from efforts such as making engineering improvements to our system. Removing parking spaces until we can reduce our reliance on personal vehicles disadvantages businesses in some areas like our downtown and multi-unit residential areas that rely on on-street parking for residents. These area are already short on parking spaces. My preferred solution is to build bike boulevards on some streets and encourage bicyclists to use these safer routes that eliminate conflict between vehicle and bicycle use. I strongly support better crossing infrastructure such as medians and crossing signals.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Somewhat support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

Lowering speed limits—A common complaint by residents of Ward 8 is that arterial and other relatively high-speed streets cut directly through several residential neighborhoods. Multiple pedestrians and bicyclists have been hit by cars in these areas and I believe there is ample evidence that we need to lower speed limits and/or employ other traffic calming tactics.

Automated cameras—I support the use of automated cameras as an enforcement tactic. While working in the state legislature I did background research for a bill on this topic and found that fees and fines can result in a self-sustaining program that does not cost taxpayers any extra dollars.

Parking spaces—As discussed above, I support modifying parking system designs to create safer space for bicyclists, especially in areas surrounding bike path and street intersections. I clicked “Somewhat support” because I believe this must be done with an intention to avoid as much adverse impact to neighborhoods as possible.

Better crossing infrastructure—Street and intersection design is an essential piece of our Vision Zero plan. Better crossing infrastructure is a high priority for me as it tends to foster feelings of safety and higher rates of things like bicycling and walking.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat support.
Removing parking spaces? Don’t know.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

There are few areas in city planning where the data is more clear: lowering speed limits directly leads to fewer deaths. Just months ago, I was teaching high schoolers in the Financial District of NYC. I am sure I don’t have to tell anyone here that Eugene is all the more beautiful for the fact that our residents are not in a constant hurry.

The reality of our world is that people need direct incentives to drive at safe speeds, at all hours and in all neighborhoods. The reason I do not count my support for cameras as “strong” is because of general cautiousness surrounding privacy and surveillance.

In every single infrastructural decision I have made in my previous elected positions, I have always sought to consider the impact on people with disabilities. That is why my position is undecided here. Cyclist safety is paramount, but might be better served with continued awareness campaigns around sharing the road.

Walking is a deeply underrated way to get around Eugene; its efficacy should be protected whenever possible.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

In first question, speed kills. We know that; and we can change it.

Regarding lights, our city has and will continue to be unable to force drivers to obey stop lights using police officers. Cameras are an excellent way to change bad driving habits.

As for parking spaces, this is a challenging transition. In most cases, houses and businesses have off-street parking options, and it make more sense to promote a community goal of active transportation rather than compromise that goal for a few property owners. It requires a respectful, two-way conversation and is definitely challenging in certain areas. In the future, those debates will be less divisive as people come to value the greater accessibility and safety of the biking infrastructure.

Crossing infrastructure is our most prevalent need. Neighborhoods across this city are bisected by busy corridors with widely spaced protected crossing. In the most benign sense, this disincentivizes walking; in the worst cases, it leads to fatalities as people try to cross busy streets without a cross walk or light.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat oppose.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Somewhat support.

I do oppose the widespread, general, use of automatic cameras for traffic. They do have a lot of negatives, even though in some places they can help to reduce fatalities and bring in revenue. I would say they would be helpful in targeted location, short term, if locally owned and operated, but I know if it will outweigh the downsides. I don’t want to add to the surveillance state, or give out lots of new tickets needing added court service, etc.

This city is full of creative thinkers with good background knowledge, I am sure we can lower fatalities without resorting to cameras.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

Lowering speed limits? Somewhat support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly oppose.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

Speed Limits are hand to remind folks “this is how fast you should go.” I don’t think I’ll have time to see which streets and neighborhoods you’re looking to target, but I’m sure you have folks much more educated than I am in traffic flow deciding if a reduced limit will work or not.

I’m pretty opposed to more “surveillance” for our safety since we’re losing more control over our personal information as technology plays a bigger role in our daily lives, and so there’d need to be some hard numbers of how much this saves for me to want to encourage traffic cams, especially since tickets are punitive punishment on the poor since they’re regressive flat fees, and that can lead to more reckless behavior down the line, which is something we need to prevent.

We definitely need more bike lanes. While removing parking is a tough sell without replacing more, for folks that need to work downtown without access to public transit or to business owners already getting squeezed out by cheaper online competitors delivering products to folks’ door. Looking at accessibility as well if parking was taken out for folks not so mobile is another detail I’d need to commit strongly one way or another.

Yes. I’ve seen nothing but good results from this with no significant increase in commute while creating a safer space for everyone.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Successful and additional actions?

What are the most successful actions Eugene is already taking based on the “Six E’s” of transportation safety? If elected, what additional actions will you take?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

We have shifted some mindsets to focus our transportation design on moving people as opposed to moving cars, and that has been reflected in the details of some of the designs—for example, we have moved from rejecting marking crosswalks at non-signalized intersections to adding to them.

One of the things that I’ve seen during my time on the Active Transportation Committee, the Eugene Budget Committee, and advocating surrounding land use issues in Eugene is that while City Council will frequently pass admirable high-level goals, when they are confronted with oppositions to specific changes needed to accomplish those goal by those who are well served by the status quo there is hesitancy, delay, and opposition. This has been shown in several bike lane projects over the past years that would remove parking or travel lanes. If elected, I will support our City in following through with the commitments we have already made in planning and vision documents such as Vision Zero, even if some individuals are vocal about their preference to leave things the way that they are.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

I think we are doing great on engineering better traffic flow, and equity; but I see education and engagement as weaker points in our progress.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

Eugene has been very vocal about promoting and educating the people of Eugene about Vision Zero and how it can help protect our residents. Due to COVID-19 and the reduced number of cars on the road, city staff has decided to begin working on the traffic lights in heavily trafficked areas, like on 13th Ave. This will support the engineering of our roadways. With the Payroll Tax implemented, the Eugene Police Department will have more officers to enforce speed limits and laws against impaired driving. As stated above, I hope to continue enforcement of the law with the implementation of the Red Light Cameras in heavily trafficked areas, which has been proven to reduce traffic crashes. As a city councilor, I want to address parking requirements in the Downtown area and implement policies for a more environmentally friendly city, which will encourage drivers to transition into alternative transportation options.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

Safer Routes to School is a great program and I have enjoyed riding with the kids. Bike riding and safety are taught in elementary schools and they are critical (and lifelong) skills.

The Transportation Plan is never large enough or funded enough but we do pay attention to equitably sharing of resources for improvements across the city and get regular updates on progress.

With increased funding for public safety, we have more officers available for traffic stops and those make a difference both with consequences and education. We have considered red light cameras and I think they are a good idea for safety (and revenue—behave or pay!).

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

I am not aware enough about the cities polices regarding transportation safety to make a fair assessment.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

Eugene is currently certified as a Gold Level BFC and Gold Level Walk Friendly Community by the League of American Bicyclists and the Pedestrian & Bicycle Information Center, respectively.

When elected I will press hard that the Move EUG Active Transportation Strategy continue to be implemented.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

After reviewing Vision Zero performance metrics as outlined in the appendix to Administrative Order 58-19-04, I applaud the BEST task force members and technical advisory committee for so thoroughly documenting actions, time frames, and KPI in regards to data analysis and encouraging safer behavior. In regards to supporting an institutional commitment to Vision Zero, especially, all “Six E’s” are clearly embraced by the community of stakeholders upholding Vision Zero principles.

However, studying “Embracing Equity in Safe Routes to School Programs,” it seems clear that equity is an area of improvement throughout our community, especially in regards to traffic safety. Like I have on the Lane Community College Board of Education, I will continue to make data-driven decisions while using the equity lens when taking a particular action. I carried a resolution at LCC thanking lawmakers for supporting a driver’s license for all as we have undocumented students and/or children of undocumented parents attending Lane. The safety and well-being of all our community members is vital.

Further, ORSRTS makes clear, “Children from low-income families are twice as likely as children, from wealthier families to walk to school, but they often face significant traffic and personal safety challenges on the trip to school.” This disparity is alarming and it is imperative that sidewalk infill, inspection and maintenance of sidewalks, and critical safety infrastructure investments are made.

Especially as an update to the Vision Zero Action Plan will occur in 2023, I will work collaboratively to ensure vital infrastructure investments are equitable and the transportation needs and safety of all travelers, including people of all ages, abilities, races, ethnicities, and incomes are addressed. Whether investments are made to improve the safety of students and seniors on Fox Hollow, East Amazon, or High Street and E. 28th here in South Eugene or if it is a community in Bethel, West Eugene, North Eugene, the Whiteaker neighborhood, University area, Friendly Street, or Downtown, ensuring we are viewing transportation safety with an equitable lens throughout our community is paramount.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

We have improved traffic engineering in some parts of town that has resulted in safer streets including reducing speed limits, installing pedestrian islands with dedicated cross walks on larger boulevards such as River Road. We created a protected bike lane on East Amazon along with a pedestrian/bicycle-only traffic light phase at the intersection with Hilyard. We are finally increasing our traffic enforcement as well. Our chief of police has reinstated a dedicated traffic enforcement team with the additional funding that council provided to our police department.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

Engineering is probably the most expensive of the Six E’s, but also the most successful measure. While I believe all of the Six E’s comprise the correct actions, and I always favor things like education, I also believe a stronger enforcement needs to be a part of the solution set. If elected, I will also be interested in receiving an ongoing evaluation of our progress in promoting transportation safety.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

Vision Zero is an iterative process that entails regular evaluation and evidence-based decision-making. Using an example discussed above, I believe our rollout of protected bike lanes has demonstrated great results and that we have sufficient justification to expand the concept throughout Eugene. Using the “Six E’s” as a framework, I will proactively engage with our communities (encouragement and education) to discover the areas of greatest need, work closely with staff to ensure we follow the will of our residents to the greatest extent possible (enforcement and engineering), and guide the new infrastructure first to areas with high concentrations of vulnerable and underserved populations (equity). In accordance with the processes already laid out in Vision Zero, data tracking and regular evaluation will be integrated into every step of the expansion.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

There are a great deal of successes. Getting the word out about them—without painting too rosy a picture of the accomplishments of city government—are deeply important to me. We require a cultural shift that would benefit from a changing of the guard.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

The City has successfully improved transportation safety through enforcement measures and engineering at some of the more dangerous roads in Eugene. Lowering the speed limits on some high crash roads and increasing speed readers are two enforcement actions that have made a real difference in decreasing speed violations. Interestingly, during the current Stay Home order we seem to be losing ground on safety. With fewer cars on the road, more people are tempted to drive faster. Education will be key and we will have to continue to direct our attention to reduce distracted driving and better understanding of basic traffic laws. Catching people running red lights would be a good start. As mayor, I have the platform to voice this priority. Safety goes hand in hand with encouraging active transportation and meeting our climate goals. It is top of mind for me.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

Lowering limits, safety help, helmet and car seat giveaways and help, increasing bike lanes, separating cars from bikes and pedestrians, new bike lanes, targeted enforcement.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

I like the EmX. This is what we need more of. The Bike Share and protected bike lanes are nice. The way the storm drains are set up can make biking in some parts of Eugene really inaccessible which is something I’d want to fix.

Encouragement is hard when there’s bus routes being cut to those that can’t afford cars, so we need to look at who we’re encouraging. There’s a myth that public transit makes things as accessible as cars which never gets addressed when we discuss why we need more robust public transit and not make it “an extra burden.”

Education on this has sadly become a point of ideology, and while car commercials run not-stop it’s an uphill battle. Showing the carbon saving or job creation would be good places I see to angle it.

Traffic Fines are a regressive form that illustrate how dual tracked our justice system is. “Enforcement” only punishes those without resources as it’s practiced now so minimally I’d prorate them a majority of them to folks’ income.

I would look for ways to widen streets to make more room for bike lanes, and push more of the “walk signal” before the green light options to help cars stop and pause. I’d also expand the Beltline by Delta but I don’t think we have the money, but I do see there being more traffic to that area of town in the next decade.

Transportation is made inequitable by the way we choose to fund it, putting so much into cars. What good does more electric charging stations do when folks have to walk a mile to a bus stop to commute for sometimes two hours to get to work? Looking at investments in bike infrastructure or bus routes we can see where the lens of “equity’’ extends in Eugene, and what neighborhoods it excludes.

Looking at the way traffic has changed on streets I’ve seen this work done on, I’d say that it’s models of evaluating safety have been responsive to the places that needed it with solutions that seem to fit the situation. I still don’t like roundabouts, but they do make traffic friendlier.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

Funding Priorities

Adopted in February 2017, the Eugene Transportation System Plan outlines five goals:

  1. Create an integrated transportation system that is safe and efficient; supports the Metro Plan’s land use diagram, Envision Eugene, A Community Vision for 2032 (2012), the City of Eugene’s target for a 50 percent reduction in fossil fuel consumption, and other City land use and economic development goals; reduces reliance on single-occupancy automobiles; and enhances community livability.
  2. Advance regional sustainability by providing a transportation system that improves economic vitality, environmental health, social equity, and overall well-being.
  3. Strengthen community resilience to changes in climate, increases in fossil fuel prices, and economic fluctuations by making the transportation networks diverse, adaptable, and not reliant on any single mode.
  4. Address the transportation needs and safety of all travelers, including people of all ages, abilities, races, ethnicities, and incomes. Through transportation investments, respond to the needs of system users, be context sensitive, and distribute the benefits and impacts of transportation decisions fairly throughout the City.
  5. By the year 2035 triple the percentage of trips made on foot, by bicycle, and by transit from 2014 levels.
Priority projects over 20 years?

The Eugene Transportation System Plan outlines priority projects over 20 years. See Chapter 5: Transportation Priorities and Project Categories on pages 55–78 of Volume 1 of the TSP. Are these the right priorities for Eugene? Will you advocate for different priorities?

Sean Dwyer (for Ward 1)

(no response)

Eliza Kashinsky (for Ward 1)

I support the overall stated priorities of the TSP; it is a key method for achieving a number of our goals as a City, and the stated priorities align with the broad goals of increasing safety, promoting equity, and reducing climate impact in our transportation system which I share. The TSP has a list of projects that are hoped to be accomplished over the next 20 years and beyond, but it hasn’t been placed in more detailed priority order, and without more detailed consultation about individual projects, I cannot weigh in on if a neighborhood greenway on Spyglass Drive should be a higher priority than a sidewalk improvement on Holly Ave. We will need continued evaluation of these projects to determine if they are successfully increasing safety and encouraging active transportation, and be ready to re-prioritized and realign them if they are not accomplishing our goals.

Candice King (for Ward 1)

Vision Zero is a robust and data based plan. Unless new suggesting a stronger alternative course arises, Eugene should continue to pursue implementing the current recommended strategies.

Tim Morris (for Ward 1)

I am in full support of the Transportation System Plan. This plan addresses housing, environmental, transit and transportation concerns in a deliberate, thorough manner. Eugene is growing rapidly and we must make thoughtful, long-term plans to get people to where they need to go. If we plan it right, we can create infrastructure that is environmentally friendly, safe, and self-sufficient.

Emily Semple (for Ward 1)

I think our priorities will change a great deal in the next twenty years and they may change faster as the effects of the Coronavirus are felt everywhere.

I believe we need better mass transit, which, right now, is buses. Better coverage and more frequent trips would increase ridership and that would be good for the environment as well as keeping people safe. I also think buses should be free. Without the need to buy, make payments for, repair, buy gas and oil and tires and parking and insurance, many people would just get on the bus. Our road planning needs to make space for buses, both along main transit corridors and neighborhood feeder roads. I always want safer sidewalks, street crossings and more protected bike lanes.

Daniel Liev Williams (for Ward 1)

This plan is not adequate. We are in the midst of a climate crisis that only gets worse every day. Eugene needs to eliminate pollutants as soon as possible. This plan also must require a concrete goal of 100% of commuting done with non-emissive transportation by 2035, public bus stops within 2,500 feet of any residence or workplace within city limits, and any bus stop within the city serviced no less than ever 20 minutes between 6am and 11pm. In addition, this plan should also include a program to make bicycle ownership available to any income level, and a commitment to free access and 100% coverage to anyone with mobility disabilities.

Kate Davidson (for Ward 2)

It’s a good plan. I support it.

Matt Keating (for Ward 2)

The key takeaway from the Eugene Transportation System Plan is that 2035 TSP must remain “relevant and responsive over time.” I appreciate and applaud such forward-looking flexibility.

The core component of our Eugene City Council campaign is addressed squarely in Chapter 1 of the TSP: “An identified potential action item is to review City Code and amend it if needed to enable additional opportunities to provide bikeways and improved pedestrian connections between key destinations, transit stops, and residential areas with new development and redevelopment.” (Transit strategies #5 and #7.)

Such an action is fundamental to address our housing, transportation, and climate goals. If we revisit City Code and land-use law to allow for modest, built-to-scale residential-commercial building along top tier transportation corridors, we could reduce our carbon footprint, encourage increased use of world-class transportation lines, promote the use of locally sourced sustainable/renewable goods, and provide one answer among many that are needed to address the housing crisis.

As South Eugene’s next city councilor, such an action—as outlined in the Envision Eugene model—is a top priority.

Even as we work to get our workforce returned to the workplace safely, we must address affordable housing, transportation safety, sustainability, climate recovery, and the mental health crisis in our community.

I look forward to meeting these challenges together. For more, contact me at 541-515-3819, online at mattkeating.org or via email at oregonmattkeating@gmail.com.

Thank you.

Douglas Barr (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Charles “Cliff” Gray (for Ward 7)

(no response)

Claire Syrett (for Ward 7)

I support the priorities in Eugene’s TSP. While progress towards our goals can seem slow at times, I believe we are on the right track. I will continue to look for ways to advance these goals in my next term in office.

Randy Groves (for Ward 8)

They seem like reasonable priorities, but I don’t feel that I have enough technical knowledge to provide a specific response. In general, as I’ve already stated, I support measures that improve safety and believe that engineering solutions are amongst some of our best options. I’m supportive of the city’s Transportation Safety Plan and I believe in the tenants supported by Vision Zero. As for the current timelines, what I don’t believe any of us know at this point, regardless of what any candidate says, is what are the impacts and longer-term economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. As mentioned above, I do serve on the city’s Budget Committee, and I’m looking forward to receiving an updated forecast in the near future. Yes, I support efforts to improve safety. I just need a better understanding of our new financial realities regarding timelines.

Ryan Moore (for Ward 8)

An admirable amount of thought and care went into the drafting of the Transportation System Plan and it is incredibly valuable as a guiding document. However, this volume was finalized before passage of the 2017 omnibus transportation bill by the Oregon state legislature. A substantial amount of new funding was made available and I believe Eugene has been able to use a portion of it for certain projects listed in the TSP. Additionally, I have consulted with city staff on the feasibility of creating an overlay for these projects with estimated reductions in carbon emissions that could occur as a result. It will be a heavy lift but I see this as a critical piece of the current planning process for how to meet our climate recovery goals. A conservative estimate is that our transportation systems account for roughly a third of Eugene’s sector-based carbon emissions. To me, the TSP seems like a tremendous opportunity for us to lay down some solid metrics on how we should approach our collective impact on climate change. This will be one of my highest priorities once elected to City Council.

Thomas Hiura (for Mayor)

I am in agreement with these priorities. I would be open to dialogue about additional priorities, particularly with regard to equity (which communities are underrepresented in this list of projects?) I am particularly appreciative of:

    – The Beltline/Delta interchange project.

    – Attention paid to sidewalks and shared use paths.

Robert Patterson (for Mayor)

(no response)

Benjamin Ricker (for Mayor)

(no response)

Lucy Vinis (for Mayor)

Our Transportation System Plan coupled with our Vision Zero Action Plan are the right priorities for Eugene. It is the essential infrastructure that enables us to address the dual challenges of climate change and population growth. A safe, well designed system ensures that residents across the community benefit from a range of transportation options to suit their needs—whether that means safe driving conditions, convenient bus service or safe biking and walking options.

Stacey Westover (for Mayor)

I think we have a good plan right now.

Matthew Yook (for Mayor)

I’d be curious to seeing how EMX or other dedicated mass transit lanes could fit into the auxiliary lane expansion of Beltline, as the expansion of its capacity as a transit route is obvious, and I like the planning put into the interchanges that have large amounts of congestion—it was a 15 minute car ride in congested Beltline traffic vs a 2+ hour bus and walk ride to get my boy to school.

Seeing some of the details around the increased multimodal transportation on the streets I don’t like biking on but have no choice is something I will definitely look further into, but I appreciate the adoption of bike and pedestrian accessibility as we grow and learn. Seeing the framework of “Vision Zero” I’m thinking that the execution of those immediate growth plans align with how I would like to see our transit structure grow with a recognition of those problem places across Eugene from congestion to pedestrian and traffic interaction, as Mayor I would definitely promote the importance of incorporating a mass transit corridor along Beltline. I would also see what bike signs we can place to make navigation through some of the neighborhoods to get to the next leg of bike path easier since they can get squirrelly. Opening up 8th street to two way traffic seems like it’ll be a good step for alleviating 6th and 7th. Hwy 99, River Road, and NW Expressway can take a lot of bandwidth while folks are still trying to use that artery to go from East to West and the light timing on some of those side streets can be evened out.

Zondie Zinke (for Mayor)

(no response)

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