Transportation Safety Questionnaire for City of Springfield Candidates

This transportation safety questionnaire was distributed to all City of Springfield candidates running for office in the May 2020 primary election. It was developed by BEST and community partners to assist candidates in informing voters on an important issue of community concern.

Responses from all candidates were accepted through Monday, April 27. There are eight questions in four sections: About You, Goals, Actions, and Funding Priorities. All questions were optional.

As a 501(c)(3) educational nonprofit organization, BEST does not support or oppose any candidate for elected office. BEST is sharing the responses we received as a public service.

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Questions

  • Candidates
  • About You
    • Your own travel choices?
      How frequently do you travel in each of the following ways?
    • Safety in Springfield?
      Have you experienced, witnessed or heard about (near) crashes that have harmed or endangered people in Springfield (within the last five years)? Check all that apply.
    • Candidate statement?
      What do you wish to say to Springfield voters about your goals, plans and priorities for transportation safety if elected?
  • Goals
    • Springfield’s efforts?
      In a typical year, how many people do you estimate die or are seriously injured in traffic crashes in Springfield? What are your goals for transportation safety? To advance these goals, should Springfield do more, less, or about the same as it has been doing?
    • Vision Zero?
      If elected, will you push for the City of Springfield to adopt the Vision Zero approach to transportation safety? Why or why not?
  • Actions
    • Specific actions?
      How strongly do you oppose or support each of the following possible enforcement and engineering actions?
    • Successful and additional actions?
      What are the most successful actions Springfield is already taking based on the “Six E’s” of transportation safety? If elected, what additional actions will you take?
  • Funding Priorities
    • Priority projects over 20 years?
      The Springfield Transportation System Plan outlines priority projects over 20 years. Are these the right priorities for Springfield? Will you advocate for different priorities?

Responses

Candidates

In the May 19, 2020 Primary Election in the City of Springfield 8 candidates have filed for 4 seats (listed by ward and then alphabetically):

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)
Kris McAlister

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)
Kori Rodley

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)
Johanis Tadeo

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)
Leonard Stoehr

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)
Joe Pishioneri

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)
Gregg Ybarra

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)
Mike Eyster

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)
Christine Lundberg

About You

Please begin by telling us about yourself.

Your own travel choices?

How frequently do you travel in each of the following ways?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

Electric motorcycle.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a month.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Few times a month.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Few times a month.

Currently, due to the Coronavirus crisis, I am working from home and not driving at all! I typically drive to work (3 miles away) and have had periods in my adult life when I used only bicycle for work commute and only bus–so I have a variety of experiences with transportation.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a year.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Few times a year.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

Travel choices have included telecommuting due to pandemic.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

Driving alone? Few times a year.
Carpooling? Several times a week.
Riding a bus? Never.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Several times a week.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Never.

Also climb Mt. Pisgah every Saturday morning.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

Driving alone? Several times a week.
Carpooling? Few times a year.
Riding a bus? Few times a year.
Bicycling? Never.
On a skateboard or scooter? Never.
Walking? Few times a month.
Using a mobility device? Never.
Telecommuting? Several times a week.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Safety in Springfield?

Have you experienced, witnessed or heard about (near) crashes that have harmed or endangered people in Springfield (within the last five years)? Check all that apply.

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

In in a motor vehicle?? Experienced. Witnessed. Heard.
Riding a bus? Witnessed. Heard.
Bicycling? Witnessed. Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter?? Heard.
Walking? Experienced. Witnessed. Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

In in a motor vehicle?? Experienced.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Witnessed.
On a skateboard or scooter?? Heard.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

Last year, we were rear-ended turning right off of Pioneer Parkway in downtown Springfield. No injuries, but damage.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

In in a motor vehicle?? Witnessed.
Riding a bus? Heard.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter?? Heard.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

Witnessed the aftermath of the horrible accident at 54th and Main that killed a mother and her children.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

In in a motor vehicle?? Heard.
Riding a bus? Don’t know.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter?? Heard.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Don’t know.

East Main Street is very dangerous!

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

In in a motor vehicle?? Heard.
Riding a bus? Don’t know.
Bicycling? Heard.
On a skateboard or scooter?? Don’t know.
Walking? Heard.
Using a mobility device? Heard.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Candidate statement?

What do you wish to say to Springfield voters about your goals, plans and priorities for transportation safety if elected?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

I believe roadways and walkways are vital parts of the community. No business, residence, or community effort is off this grid, and so we must maintain and sustain it, as a natural consideration, instead of specialized asks.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

I believe that improved infrastructure for all types of transportation is important, along with a clear focus on improving safety. We have room for improvement in providing increased safety for pedestrian and bicycle transportation through the main arteries in Springfield and we have opportunity to improve safety along the Main Street out toward Thurston. Focusing on improving the safety and efficiencies is a priority of mine and will be when I join the Springfield City Council.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

I would like to see commercial trucks removed from Main Street if they don’t have a delivery on that street. The truckers don’t want to be there, and the public doesn’t want them there either.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

Priority One: Make Main Street safe for everyone (vehicles, pedestrians, bikers).

Goals: 1) Remove our main street as “one of the most unsafe streets in Oregon.” 2) Carefully plan main street projects for the growing population (increased traffic) in the near future.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

I began knocking on doors as a part of my campaign before COVID-19 forced me to stop. Street safety was brought up by many of the people as I was talking with them at their doors. Concerns ranged from traffic going too fast to the need for enhanced crosswalks. We know that traffic injuries and fatalities are preventable. We know that we have streets in Springfield where injuries and fatalities are more likely to occur. We know that we have expertise in the community to recommend specific actions to City Council for improving street safety. We know that our Main Street is among the most unsafe streets in Oregon. These facts point toward a need for action.

It should be noted that there are multiple benefits to enhanced street safety. Many of the actions related to street safety also result in enhanced health for citizens through increased movement (walking/biking/rolling). In addition, the concepts of safety integrate with walkable neighborhoods which reduce green house gas emission and traffic congestion, as well as sprawl. Integrating all of these efforts is a good guide to policy development in general.

Perhaps the biggest difference between me and the incumbent is that I will listen to good ideas and seek opportunities to work regionally, as opposed to rejecting ideas because they didn’t originate in Springfield. I will work strategically and use data to guide decision-making.

GOALS

• Complete the Main Street Safety Project.

• Conduct an assessment of street safety issues and concerns:

    – Meet with BPAC, City staff, Council members, Lane Transit District, and business leaders to get an overview of the street safety issues.

    – Review available data that has been collected by the city re: street safety.

    – Review data collected by other organizations regarding street safety.

• Invite recommendation(s) to the City Council for action toward eliminating fatalities and serious injuries on our streets.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Goals

Now tell us about the transportation safety goals you support.

Springfield’s efforts?

In a typical year, how many people do you estimate die or are seriously injured in traffic crashes in Springfield? What are your goals for transportation safety? To advance these goals, should Springfield do more, less, or about the same as it has been doing?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

Dozens hurt or killed in our transportation network. I want to help advocate to the state to alter the color of the pedestrian lights, due to their closeness in hue of the signs. I would like to explore some alternative walkways and intersection configurations, with the intent to logically and intuitively challenge the traditional strategies.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

The most dangerous area of Springfield is the long “Main Street Corridor” heading from Downtown Springfield out through Thurston and turning into the McKenzie Highway. The many access roads/driveways, the four-lane width and the lack of sufficient safe crosswalks all contribute to anywhere from 1 or 2 up to a dozen fatalities each year. I think it is important for Springfield to focus on slowing down traffic through this corridor, and providing ways to improve safety for pedestrians in particular (many fatalities have been in crosswalk or pedestrians trying to cross.) While the city has begun this process, I do believe we need to keep the focus on this and also look at ways to create safe, alternative transportation options to help cut down on the automobile traffic.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

Prorated based on the Lane County figures, Springfield has about 70 killed per year. I would like to see if we can reduce posted speed limits and then enforce them closely. Springfield responded quickly to a spike in deaths and injuries on Main Street. We can always do better.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

Unfortunately many. Lane County led the state with most deaths a few years ago. Main Street in Springfield was cited as one of roads where fatalities occurred.

Goals for transportation safety. 1)&nbps;Education, 2)&nbps;Driver/Bike training, 3)&nbps;Street design.

Springfield so do more to reach these goals.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

I estimate that there are over 150 serious crashes annually in Springfield, with around 6 of those being severe crashes. I estimate that on average there are one or two traffic fatalities annually in Springfield. Some percentage, perhaps all of these crashes, serious injuries and fatalities are preventable, therefore more needs to be done.

Springfield needs to do more to prevent crashes and serious injuries. The Main Street Safety Project has languished for years. It has been stopped and re-started several times by the city. It needs to be completed. Springfield needs to do more than what they have been doing for the past years. I will be more collaborative in working with ODOT, Lane Transit District, and residents to keep this project moving.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Vision Zero?

If elected, will you push for the City of Springfield to adopt the Vision Zero approach to transportation safety? Why or why not?

Vision Zero is a strategy to eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. First implemented in Sweden in the 1990s, Vision Zero has proved successful across Europe—and now it’s gaining momentum in major American cities. For example, see What is Vision Zero?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

I support the heart of this plan but do not feel it is as dialed as it could be, on a local level, and could be hindered as many of our desired changes, by other jurisdictional consideration. With lots of moving parts, an incomplete shift can cause more harm or lessen productivity. We must use pragmatic and innovative ways to keep lives safe.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

First, I appreciate the adoption of a proven and well-thought-out plan. Second, as someone who is very interested and works hard to make systems-level change in regard to equity, diversity, access, and inclusion, I appreciate this plan has these goals woven into the core. The short answer is, yes, I support Vision Zero.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

I applaud Vision Zero’s focus on reductions in deaths and injuries. I would like to create public transportation that would reduce the need for car ownership and further reduce the risk of accidents.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

Yes. I love the Vision Zero concept. It will take time and money, but worth it to eliminate traffic related fatalities.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

Whether or not Springfield adopts the Vision Zero specifically the goal of eliminating traffic fatalities and serious injuries will be presented to Council for discussion and action.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Actions

Professionals talk about the “Six E’s” of transportation safety:

  1. Encouragement,
  2. Education,
  3. Enforcement,
  4. Engineering,
  5. Equity, and
  6. Evaluation.
Specific actions?

How strongly do you oppose or support each of the following possible enforcement and engineering actions?

  1. Lowering speed limits to minimize fatal or serious injury crashes?
  2. Using automated cameras to enforce speed limits or stop lights?
  3. Removing parking spaces to create safer areas for people bicycling?
  4. Installing better crossing infrastructure to for people walking?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

Lowering speed limits? Somewhat oppose.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat oppose.
Removing parking spaces? Somewhat support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

I believe that education and efficient road systems can mitigate harm, and the quicker some get through specific areas, the less likely they are to harm others. Smart design and parallel options to travel will help minimize risk, while cameras without systemic change are only bandaids and revenue generators.

Safer cars, smarter systems, educated citizenry, and restorative and corrective enforcement are where we find safer and healthier roadways and pathways.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

Honestly, I am supportive of all the ways of improving safe transportation and encouraging alternative transportation.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Strongly oppose.
Removing parking spaces? Somewhat support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Somewhat support.

All of these measures need to be considered in the specific contexts of locales and traffic conditions.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support: especially in neighborhoods.

Using automated cameras? Somewhat oppose: Where will the cameras be located?

Removing parking spaces? Somewhat support: Limited parking in some areas. I’d rather educate bicyclers to walk their bikes in those areas.

Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support: Always a good idea. Especially on a street that has a history of accidents/fatalities.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

Lowering speed limits? Strongly support.
Using automated cameras? Somewhat support.
Removing parking spaces? Strongly support.
Better crossing infrastructure? Strongly support.

I had multiple people talk with me about the need for more signalized crosswalks. People also had strong feelings about the need to reduce speed on the streets.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Successful and additional actions?

What are the most successful actions Springfield is already taking based on the “Six E’s” of transportation safety? If elected, what additional actions will you take?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

I feel the city has helped with more pedestrian crossing, and configuring of lights to help on main throughways… I would continue to improve the signaling and lane management efforts, to maximize our capacity throughout the city, and improve parking options for all Springfield residents.

I would like to explore addressing lighting and signals for bicycles and pedestrians that challenge the current setup, as a means to evaluate whether public safety or perception is where it is optimized.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

Springfield has begun the process of evaluation safety along the most dangerous areas with a focus on engineering. There is room for improvement in terms of education, equity, and enforcement.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

See above.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

Engineering: A good start was adding crosswalks on East Main Street. Still have a way to go.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

There are small pockets of success scattered throughout Springfield. The Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee is an active and engaged committee that provides input to the City Council on a wide range of safety issues that encompass the Six E’s. They set goals and work diligently to accomplish those goals.

The City of Springfield has lagged in its implementation of the Main Street Safety Program. It has lingered for years and was delayed by the City due to bumbling and indecisiveness by City leadership. Springfield will do better under my leadership by more fully integrating with regional efforts and working with partners such as Lane Transit District.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

Funding Priorities

Adopted in July 2014, the Springfield Transportation System Plan outlines four goals:

  1. Community Development—Provide an efficient, sustainable, diverse, and environmentally sound transportation system that supports and enhances Springfield’s economy and land use patterns.
  2. System Management—Preserve, maintain, and enhance Springfield’s transportation system through safe, efficient, and cost-effective transportation system operations and maintenance techniques for all modes.
  3. System Design—Enhance and expand Springfield’s transportation system design to provide a complete range of transportation mode choices.
  4. System Financing—Create and maintain a sustainable transportation funding plan that provides implementable steps towards meeting Springfield’s vision.
Priority projects over 20 years?

The Springfield Transportation System Plan outlines priority projects over 20 years. Are these the right priorities for Springfield? Will you advocate for different priorities?

Kris McAlister (for Ward 3)

I would like to see more alter-abled paths and considerations in Springfield, as well as coordinated intersections that are equal access to each transportation choice. Better walking paths and special paths for bicycles and skateboards.

Kori Rodley (for Ward 3)

I do think these are solid priorities, and I think we will need to stay diligent to making adjustments as the communities grow. With 10–20 year plans, there has to be room to adjust and prioritize when growth happens in unexpected ways or we have new challenges pop up.

Johanis Tadeo (for Ward 3)

(no response)

Leonard Stoehr (for Ward 4)

I would make clean energy and fuels a priority, as well as making it easier to take the bus and carpool.

Joe Pishioneri (for Ward 6)

(no response)

Gregg Ybarra (for Ward 6)

I would advocate for the Main Street project to move up the list as a higher priority.

Mike Eyster (for Mayor)

Springfield’s 2035 Transportation System Plan was just adopted. Making a 20 year plan is challenging under any circumstances. However, COVID-19 makes predicting even more difficult. We have no idea how long we will need to remain isolated, what long lasting societal changes will result from COVID (will people be less likely to use public transit? Will companies be reducing the need for employees to work on site and therefore reducing the need for daily commuting? What impact it will have on commerce and the need for transportation infrastructure. How long will the resulting recession last? Will the recession trigger a massive infrastructure investment to stimulate the economy, or will recessionary fear result in the federal government tightening spending?

Within this context, it seems to me that the Springfield 2035 TSP is thorough, well organized and well written. I think municipal governments are going to need to be nimble, creative, and prepared for multiple possibilities. Springfield like all communities needs to be prepared for at least two possibilities: 1. It’s possible that substantial federal funding may be made available for infrastructure projects. 2. Just the opposite is also possible. Springfield needs to be prepared for either. Springfield also needs to do more planning and policy development that promotes walkable vibrant neighborhoods. Springfield needs to do a better job of maintaining its streets and providing safety features on streets for all modes.

Finally, COVID is providing all of us with new experience. Because there is less automobile traffic on the streets many bike riders are feeling more comfortable using the bicycles as a means of transportation. As we recover from COVID, it will be well for us to consider the utility of streets for forms of transportation other than what has been standard in previous years.

Christine Lundberg (for Mayor)

(no response)

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